Chatarra

22. Mexico
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Contact me - nadiezda11@gmail.com

EXPONDRE EN LA MOLE!!

soy feliz siiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii!!

(si, el DF)
In the corner of your eye

In the corner of your eye

Working on a project ;o)

Working on a project ;o)

Just a fool
#inktober day 7 (late again!)

Just a fool
#inktober day 7 (late again!)

#inktober  day 5 (late)

#inktober day 5 (late)

#inktober day 3! I love this show

#inktober day 3! I love this show

#inktober day 2!

#inktober day 2!

#inktober finished! Day 1

#inktober finished! Day 1

Just a few things about this ridiculous assumptions i did not make

-i’ve never said i was the spokeperson for all Mexicans (and obviously i’m not) so keep in mind this.

- I never compared Day of the dead to Halloween. People know or must know they have nothing to do with each other.

I just said that is okay if you use Halloween as an opportunity to appreciate the cultural elements of Day of the dead.

-  When i say non Mexican i mean NON MEXICAN (ex, British, brazilian, chinese, indian etc.,) If you assume i meant white people that is your opinion, not mine.

- Before doing this post i asked everyone i knew, about this topic (yes, Mexicans) and they told me it was okay.

- HOWEVER i’m not saying this is a justification, but is not only my opinion.

- Yes, i did my homework before doing the post. Yes, i have celebrated day of the dead.

Sugar skulls are

1. Decoration

2. Candy

3. Costumes

4. Represent the deceased in the altar, although they’re not sacred, they were before the spanish conquest, now they are mostly decoration.

5. You cannot,  compare this to the Native american headdress, because that is an actual piece of clothing and iconic representation of their culture (also a stereotype) They hold a way different value and a bigger significance.

What is the difference?

Sugar skulls do have value, however it is different, they’re also artcrafts, candy, decorations and costumes here in Mexico, heck, they are primarily decoration, you can use them to represent the deceased but it’s optional and not really anything sacred.

I’m not saying they don’t hold a significance, because they do, but the way we Mexican see it is not so serious, is just a part of the aesthetic for the day of the dead celebration.

La Catrina 

1. Joke/political cartoon

2. Became related to the day of the dead because of the aesthetic elements.

Day of the dead is

1. Non religious

2. An open celebration, who is evolving and expanding, which means is open for others to celebrate or enjoy it’s cultural elements.

3. it’s a syncretic celebration. Which means thanks to OTHER cultures, day of the dead could exist.

4. Not all Mexicans celebrate it, there are some parts of Mexico who celebrate this and other who do not, or celebrate it in a bigger/lower intensity.

just in case people who want to see more information i recommend this, someone who made a better job than i did.

An example of how REAL cultural appropiation works:

image

image

image

image

Quick sketch~

Quick sketch~